Thursday, October 15, 2009

Author Guest Post - Amelia Grey (& a Giveaway)

* Congrats to lucky winner - Carol *

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Amelia Grey’s awards include the Booksellers Best and the Aspen Gold, and as Gloria Dale Skinner, the coveted Romantic Times Award for Love and Laughter and the prestigious Maggie Award. Her books have been featured in Doubleday and Rhapsody Book Clubs. Her latest book - A Marquis to Marry, book two in the Rogue's Dynasty Trilogy - has just released from Sourcebooks Casablanca.

With my current book A Marquis to Marry, I learned that sometimes it’s not easy to find the answer you’re looking for no matter how hard you search. Several years ago I read a snippet of information about the Talbot pearls. Five strands of perfectly matched pearls with each strand measuring thirty-two inches. Wikipedia shows a picture of Bess of Hardwick, Countess of Shrewsbury, wearing a collar of pearls much like this. Though, through my extensive research, I found that most historians don’t believe she is wearing the Talbot pearls but pearls she bought herself.

The first time I read about the pearls I knew I wanted to use them in a book and A Marquis to Marry seemed the perfect story. It was easy to work out little details about the pearls. I decided they would belong to the hero, Race, left to him by his grandmother. And then to add a little spice to the story, I decided to have the heroine, Susannah, show up at his door claiming the pearls belonged to her family. That gave me an immediate external plot for the book, because there was no way Race was going to hand over the necklace to Susannah even if she did have documents to prove she was the rightful owner.

I worried that it might get a little boring with having just the two of them fighting over the pearls for three-hundred-and-fifty pages even if there was a hot romance going on, so I decided to add a sweet-talking buccaneer who was buying up pearls from all over the world, a master-jeweler popinjay who secured jewels for the Crown, and a seedy, one-armed antiquates dealer, all wanting possession of the famous strands of pearls. And with that many people wanting them, I knew the next thing I had to do was add a bit of intrigue and have the pearls stolen from Race.

During the entire writing of this story, I kept searching for what really became of the Talbot pearls. I made e-mail contact with a couple of libraries in England, including the one in Sheffield where the Countess of Shrewsbury lived, hoping they could help me. I was sent a lot of information about jewels but nothing on the Talbot pearls. As I neared the end of the book frustration set in. I wanted to be able to tell in the author’s notes what really became of the famous pearls, so I hired a professional researcher.

She went to work right away checking books, museums’ lists, and old account records of the Countess of Shrewsbury, but to no avail. She and I finally had to give up and assume the strands of pearls were probably sold or pawned and were eventually broken up to make smaller necklaces. But it was most disheartening not to be able to say for sure what became of the pearls. The one thing I could do was make sure A Marquis to Marry had a happier ending. At the end of the book, the real thief is caught and the pearls are found.

So now that I’ve told you how frustrating it can be for me if I can’t find the answer to a research question, why don’t you tell me, does it frustrate you if an author doesn’t clear up missing facts in her author’s notes?

Interesting question, Amelia! It does, sometimes. And when it does, I often turn to the internet to do some research of my own. But I'd much rather the author answer those missing facts. It shows a dedication and a thoroughness that's as much appreciated as their hard work in crafting the story in the first place.

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GIVEAWAY

The Prize

1 set of Amelia Grey’s books so far in this trilogy - A Duke to Die For and A Marquis to Marry - will go to one lucky winner.

To Enter
  • Just leave a comment with your email address in the body of the comment itself answering Amelia's question : does it frustrate you if an author doesn’t clear up missing facts in her author’s notes?
  • Please list your email address within your comment so that you can be notified should you be chosen as a winner.
For Extra Entries

Please leave a NEW comment for each extra entry you do.

Deadline   Midnight CST of November 15, 2009.

Eligibility  US & Canada only.

Please read the Disclaimer. Good luck!
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56 comments :

  1. I truly appreciate the detailed research that enriches Historical Romance Fiction. I absorb it all, and to me, it really deepens the impact of the story line. Thank you.

    gcwhiskas at aol dot com

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for this great giveaway!

    I am a subscriber.

    gcwhiskas at aol dot com

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you for this super contest!

    I am a follower.

    gcwhiskas at aol dot com

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good morning Everyone! I'm so happy to be her today at A Book Blogger's Diary! Thank you for having me.

    Virginia, I know I love it when an author takes the time to write a note to the readers about the book so I'm glad to hear you are with me on that.

    I'll be checking in later today to answer questions and read your comments.
    Amelia

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love reading the notes especially when it's something i'm not familier with. This sounds like a wonderful Triology I have to check her out she's a new author to me this is a new author to me i haven't been able to read something from all the authors but I love looking for my next favorite author and sounds like she writes the books i love to read!! please count me in on this awesome giveaway!!
    photoquest(at)bellsouth(dot)net

    ReplyDelete
  6. I am a subscriber by email
    photoquest(at)bellsouth(dot)net

    ReplyDelete
  7. I put in a friend request on facebook
    photoquest(at)bellsouth(dot)net

    ReplyDelete
  8. I follow your blog
    photoquest(at)bellsouth(dot)net

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'm so happy to hear so many of you say your gong to check out my Rogues' Dynasty Series. I'd love to hear from all of you after you've done that at ameliagrey@comcast.net.
    Amelia

    ReplyDelete
  10. No, it doesn't frustrate me.

    dorcontest at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  11. I subscribe by email.
    dorcontest at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  12. I follow.

    dorcontest at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  13. It does frustrate me. I love understanding the facts that may have been unclear. It makes for a better reading of the book. Thanks for the wonderful insight.

    bgcchs(at)yahoo(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  14. Email subscriber.

    bgcchs(at)yahoo(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  15. Yes, it does seem to bother me.

    lag110@mchsi.com

    ReplyDelete
  16. I subscribe via email.

    lag110@mchsi.com

    ReplyDelete
  17. I follow this blog.

    lag110@mchsi.com

    ReplyDelete
  18. I'm a follower..

    mlawson17 at hotmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  19. It does frustrate me if an author does not clear up everything and just leaves you hangin!

    mlawson17 at hotmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hi Amelia,
    I am so looking forward to reading The Rogues' Dynasty Series. I really appreciate Authors' notes at the end of the book. I have learned more in Authors' notes through the years , more then I ever learned in History class. :) But it is always noted and truly appreciated when Authors do the research . I'm only sorry you ended up frustrated about the Talbot Pearls. Thanks for the opportunity to see you here and read your post.
    Carol L.
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    ReplyDelete
  21. I'm a subscriber to diary email updates.
    Carol L.
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    ReplyDelete
  22. I'm a follower of the blog.
    Carol L.
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    ReplyDelete
  23. I appreciate the facts, but like you, I often just go online to get the facts there...

    janemaritz at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
  24. frustrate is a soft word, Yes, I agree ! I hate that
    copperllama at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
  25. Subscribe to A Book Blogger's Diary feed
    copperllama at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
  26. Subscribe to A Book Blogger's Diary Email Updates
    copperllama at yahoo dot com

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  27. a fan of A Book Blogger's Diary on Facebook
    copperllama at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
  28. Follow this blog
    copperllama at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
  29. It doesn't frustrate me at all:-)
    Thanks for the giveaway.

    libneas[at]aol[dot]com

    ReplyDelete
  30. I'm a follower - thanks@

    libneas[at]aol[dot]com

    ReplyDelete
  31. I've got your button on my left sidebar.

    Thank you.

    libneas[at]aol[dot]com

    ReplyDelete
  32. As long as I can understand the story, no, it doesn't bother me.

    You are in my blogroll and I follow your blog!
    http://sexywomenread.blogspot.com

    kaylajohnson3969@sbcglobal.net

    ReplyDelete
  33. Can't say that it bothers me. I'd like to read this book. Thanks.
    partymix25(at)hotmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  34. email subscriber
    partymix25(at)hotmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  35. I follow your blog.
    partymix25(at)hotmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  36. It doesn't frustrate me.

    +1 I subscribe through email

    lizzi0915 at aol dot com

    ReplyDelete
  37. It does bother me - the incompleteness sort of nags at me. Plus, stories that have the questions and issues resolved are more satisfying reads.

    thank you for the entry!
    gaby317nyc at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  38. email subscriber

    gaby317nyc at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  39. googlereader subscriber

    gaby317nyc at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  40. http://startingfresh-gaby317.blogspot.com/

    blogroll

    gaby317nyc at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  41. follower

    gaby317nyc at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  42. It depends on the type of book. If it were a mystery, I'd say an emphatic yes. Other books leave things open-ended to make you think about the possibilities. walkerd@primus.ca

    ReplyDelete
  43. Sometimes I wonder about some missing facts (when I can spot them!) but I usually don’t dwell on them. I don’t want to ruin the enjoyment of reading the book.

    Thanks,
    Tracey D
    booklover0226 AT gmail DOT com

    ReplyDelete
  44. +1 I am a subscriber to the feed

    Thanks,
    Tracey D
    booklover0226 AT gmail DOT com

    ReplyDelete
  45. +1 I am a subscriber to email updates

    Thanks,
    Tracey D
    booklover0226 AT gmail DOT com

    ReplyDelete
  46. Unlimited Entries - Commented on An Article by Thad Carhart

    Thanks,
    Tracey D
    booklover0226 AT gmail DOT com

    ReplyDelete
  47. I can't say that it bothers me either.

    I would love to read these books~as they sound like such good reads!

    deb55106{at}gmail{dot}com

    ReplyDelete
  48. I Subscribe to your Diary feed

    deb55106{at}gmail{dot}com

    ReplyDelete
  49. I am a email subscriber

    deb55106{at}gmail{dot}com

    ReplyDelete
  50. I am a facebook fan

    Deb S

    deb55106{at}gmail{dot}com

    ReplyDelete
  51. I don't really think it bothers me but I think it adds a nice touch to the book if the missing facts are explained. I always read the sections at the end of the book for any information about the book or the author.

    Thanks ~ megalon22{at}yahoo{dot}com

    ReplyDelete
  52. I subscribe via Google Reader
    megalon22{at}yahoo{dot}com

    ReplyDelete
  53. I have a pending friend request on Facebook (Cheryl Snyder)
    megalon22{at}yahoo{dot}com

    ReplyDelete
  54. I follow on GFC
    megalon22{at}yahoo{dot}com

    ReplyDelete
  55. Yes it Does Frustrate me.and when has know ending it makes me mad.
    I subscribe to this Blog
    sasluvbooks(at)yahoo(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  56. This giveaway is closed and the winner notified. Thanks for stopping by!

    ReplyDelete